Table History and background of Polywater phenomenon The story

 

Table of Contents

1.    
History
 and  background  of  The Polywater  Phenomenon……………………..…………….5

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

How de ladz…………………………………………………………………………………………………..5

Open a tab baiis…………………………………………………………………………………………….6

 

2.     How is
Polywater Made?………..…………………………………………………………………………..10

 

Chickens?……………………………………………………………………………………………10

Yaaaaasssssss………………………………………………………………………………………………12

 

3.     Polywater:
Fact or Viction?………………………………………………………………….…………………16

Molecular
Structure of Polywater……………………………………………………………….16

IR
Spectrum of Polywater……………………………………………………………………………17

Properties
of Polywater………………………………………………………………………………18

Polywater
Vs Water…………………………………………………………………………………….19

Uses
of Polywater……………………………………………………………………………………….20

4.    
Polywater Vs The Media…………….………………………………………………………………………….21

 

 

5.     The
Role of Pathelogical Science……….…………………………………………………………………..45

The
Definition of Pathological Science……………………………………………………….. 45

Adverse
Effects on Participating in Pathological Science……………………………. 45

Citations………………………………………………………………………………………………………45

Income………………………………………………………………………………………………………..45

Separation
in University Employment………………………………………………………….56

A
Common Trend………………………………………………………………………………………..45

Cold
Fusion………………………………………………………………………………………………….45

Neutrino
Anomaly……………………………………………………………………………………….45

Pathological
Science and Time…………………………………………………………………….45

History  and  background 
of  Polywater  phenomenon

The  story  of 
polywater  originates  during 
the  second  half 
of  the  twentieth 
century,  in  a 
time  period  which 
came  to  be 
known  as  the 
Cold  War.  The 
Cold  War  began 
following  the  surrender 
of  Nazi  Germany 
in  May  1945. 
The  Soviets  wished 
to  maintain  control 
over  Eastern  Europe 
so  as  to 
safeguard  those  countries 
against  any  future 
attack  from Germany.  They 
also  wished  to 
spread  their  communist 
ideologies  further.  The 
Americans  and  British 
Nations  feared  the 
spread  of  communism 
to  Western  European 
countries  and  took 
action  by  sending 
aid  to  these 
countries  under  Marshall 
Plan,  thereby  bringing 
Western  Europe  under 
the  influence  of 
the  Americans.  The 
Soviets  retaliated  by 
installing  Communist  regimes 
in  Eastern  European 
countries.1 
Tension  was  rife 
throughout  Europe  and 
the  rest  of 
the  world  as 
the  Americans  and 
British  fought  the 
communist  ideals  of 
the  Soviets.  A 
war  of  ideas 
ensued  between  these 
countries  and  through 
their  immeasurable  wealth, 
power  and  influence, 
they  became  known 
to  the  rest 
of  the  world 
as  “the  Superpowers”.

 

The  term  “Cold 
War”  was  originally 
coined  by  the 
English  writer  George 
Orwell  in  an 
article  published  in 
1945.  He  predicted 
a  nuclear  stalemate 
between  “two  or 
three  monstrous  super states, 
each  possessed  of 
a  weapon  by 
which  millions  of 
people  can  be 
wiped  out  in 
a  few  seconds”. 
This  description  of 
international  relations  between 
the  two  Superpowers 
in  the  second 
half  of  the 
twentieth  century  proved 
an  eerie  premonition 
of  the  tense 
power-struggle  which  would 
consume  the  World.1

 

The  American  President,  Harry 
Truman  proposed  that 
in  order  to 
contain  communist  expansion, 
military  force  was 
necessary  and  called 
for  a  four-fold 
increase  in  defence 
spending.  The  development 
of  atomic  weapons 
which  could  be 
used  to  threaten 
the  Soviets  was 
encouraged  strongly  by 
American  officials.  In 
response  to  this, 
the  Soviets  began 
testing  bomb  prototypes 
in  1949  which 
was  met  with 
promises  from  Trumann 
to  build  a 
“super-atomic Hydrogen bomb”  which  would 
be  even  more 
destructive  than  anything 
the  Soviets  would 
build.2  A  deadly and 
desperate  race  to 
find  the  most 
powerful  weapon  which 
would  give  one 
Superpower  an  advantage 
over  the  other 
ensued.  Developments  in 
nuclear  science  became 
a  priority  for 
both  Superpowers.  The 
first  Hydrogen  bomb 
was  tested  on 
November  1st,  1952, 
by  the  Americans 
in  the  Eniwetok 
Atoll  Marshall Islands  in  the  South 
Pacific.  The  Hydrogen 
bomb  is  one 
thousand  times  stronger 
than  regular  atomic 
bombs  as  they 
use  fusion,  rather 
than  fission  as 
a  power  source.3  This 
new  scientific  development 
provided  the  Americans 
with  the  type 
of  weapon  they 
could  use  to 
threaten  the  Soviets 
with,  hence  giving 
them  an  upper 
hand  in  the 
Cold  War.  This, 
in  turn  only  fuelled  the 
Soviet’s  desired  to 
further  devise  an 
even  more  powerful 
weapon  to  regain 
power  over  the 
Americans. 

 

Another  dramatic  arena 
for  the  Cold 
War  battle  was 
space  exploration.  The 
Soviets  released  the 
world’s  first  man-made 
object,  the  Sputnik 
satellite,  into  space 
in  1957.  This 
came  as  an 
unwelcome  surprise  to 
the  Americans  who 
began  to  frantically 
try  to  advance 
their  own  journey 
to  space.  In 
1958,  they  succeeded 
in  launching  their 
own  satellite,  Explorer 1, 
into the  Earth’s  orbit. 
Thus  began  the 
Space  Race  between 
the  two  Superpowers. 
President  Dwight  Eisenhower 
set  up  the 
National  Aeronautics  and 
Space  Administration  that 
year,  hoping  to 
encourage  America’s  position 
in  the  Space 
Race,  however,  the 
Soviets  succeeded  in 
launching  the  first 
man  into  space 
in  April  1961. 
The  American  president 
proclaimed  that  the 
Americans  would  successfully 
send  the  first 
man  to  the 
moon  and  in 
July  1969,  the 
first  lunar  landing 
had  been  accomplished 
by them.  This  “small 
step  for  man, 
giant  leap  for 
mankind”  effectively  won 
the  space  race 
for  the  United 
States,  especially  as 
the  Soviets  were 
unsuccessful  in  all 
four  attempts  at 
lunar  landing.4

 

The  relevance  of 
new  scientific  discoveries 
and  how  they 
were  used  to 
give  one  Superpower 
an  advantage  over 
the  other  in 
the  Cold  War 
is  evident  when 
examining  both  the 
“arms  race”  and 
the  “space  race”. 
With  tensions  running 
high  between  the 
two  nations,  advancements 
in  science  served 
as  a  means 
of  winning  the 
power  struggle  between 
capitalism  and  communism.

 

While  the  rest 
of  the  world 
was  frantically  scrambling 
to  find  a 
way  in  which 
science  could  be 
used  to  create 
a  weapon  of 
mass  destruction,  some 
chemists  happened  to 
notice  unusual  properties 
and  behaviours  of 
water,  the  most 
fundamental  and  essential 
substance  on  Earth. 
The  earliest  observations 
began  in  the 
1920’s  when  the 
inventor  of  silica 
gel,  Walter  A. 
Patrick,  noticed  that 
water  which  had  been  soaked 
up  by  the 
silica  gel  could 
not  be  fully 
evaporated.  One  of 
his  graduate  students, 
Leon  Shershefsky  wrote 
his  dissertation  on 
the  unusual  way 
water  became  more 
resistant  than  usual 
to  evaporation  when 
small  amounts  of 
it  was  sealed 
in  glass  tubes. 
Years  later,  the 
concept  was  again 
explored  by  a 
Soviet  researcher,  K. 
M.  Chmutov,  who 
repeated  Shershefsky’s  experiment 
and  then  carried 
out  his  own 
variation  of  the 
experiment,  whereby  he 
confined  the  water 
between  a  flat 
plate  and  a  curved  lens 
in  order  to 
prove  that  the 
unusual  behaviour  in 
water  was  not 
caused  solely  by 
the  glass  tubes. 
His  findings  were 
published  in  1949.5

 

In  1962,  Nikolai  Fedyakin, 
a  Russian  chemist 
at  the  Kostroma 
Institute  of  Light 
Industry,  published  his 
findings  on  the 
mysterious  behaviours  of 
water  when  stored 
in  sterilized  sealed-glass 
capillary  tubes.  Prior 
to  the  publication, 
he  had  carried 
out  experiments  similar 
to  those  which 
had  been  done 
before,  however,  his 
experiment  varied  slightly. 
Inside  a  sealed 
chamber,  he  placed 
hair-thin  capillary  tubes 
on  top  of 
each  other  horizontally 
and  not  only 
evaporated  the  water, 
but  forced  it 
to  condense  too, 
which  he  believed 
would  ensure  its 
purity.  When  he 
left  returned  to 
check  on  his 
apparatus  after  a  few  hours, 
he  discovered  a 
mysterious  oily  substance, 
similar  in  appearance 
to  that  of  Vaseline,  had 
grown  in  either 
ends  of  the 
capillary  tubes.  He 
described  this  phenomenon 
as  “offspring  water” 
and  repeated  the 
experiment,  replacing  the 
previously  used  glass 
capillary  tubes  with 
sterilized  quartz  capillary 
tubes.  Once  again, 
his  experiment  yielded 
the  same  results.?

 

Boris  Deryagin,  a 
renowned  Soviet  physical 
chemist,  decided  to 
work  in  conjunction 
with  Fedyakin  in 
order  to  further 
investigate  this  new 
form  of  water. 
They  repeated  Fedyakin’s 
experiments  and  concluded 
that  a  new 
form  of  “anomalous 
water”  had  been 
discovered.?  In  1966, 
at  the  Faraday 
Society  in  England, 
Deryagin  presented  their 
experimental  findings  to 
the  rest  of 
the  world.  In 
1967,  this  “anomalous 
water”  was  once 
again  presented  at 
Meriden  in  New 
Hampshire.  The  British 
and  Americans  were  sceptical
at  first 
and  disregarded  the 
work,  until  a 
British  researcher,  L. 
J.  Bellamy  repeated 
Deryagin’s  experiments,  which 
yielded  successful  results.? 
Deryagin  continued  to 
promote  his  discovery 
and  interest  in  the  subject 
grew  steadily,  until 
suddenly,  it  had 
consumed  the  whole 
world.  This  happened 
after  Robert  Stromberg 
and  Warren  Grant, of 
the  American  National 
Bureau  of  Standards 
succeeded  in  replicating 
the  experiments.  Over 
the  course  of 
a  year  and 
a  half,  they 
managed  to  collect 
a  couple  of 
grams  of  polywater 
and  were  able 
to  test  it’s 
unusual  properties  for 
themselves.  In  1969, 
the  Office  of 
Naval  Research  held 
a  conference  to 
discuss  the  discovery 
and  hoped  to 
devise  a  strategy 
to  further  research 
on  the  new 
phenomenon,  which  would  allow 
them  to  put 
it  to  use 
and  once  again, 
gain  an  advantage 
for  the  United 
States  over  their 
opposing  Superpower  in 
the  desperate  search 
for  a  weapon. 
It  was  at 
this  symposium  that 
Stromberg  met  the 
Maryland  Chemist,  Ellis 
Lippincott,  who  was 
speaking  about  his 
difficulties  in  successfully 
analysing  the  Infrared 
Spectrum  absorbed  by 
the  new  substance, 
a  sample  of 
which  had  been 
provided  by  the 
English  scientist,  Bellamy, 
who  outside  of 
the  Soviets,  was 
the  first  to 
grow  it.  Stromberg 
and  Lippincott  agreed 
to  collaborate  in  an  attempt 
to  further  their 
understanding  of  polywater 
by  combining  Lippincott’s 
expertise  in  Infrared 
Spectroscopy  and  Stromberg’s  ability 
to  grow  the 
polywater.?  The  results 
of  their  analysis 
was  nothing  like 
Lippincott  had  ever seen 
before.  The  spectrum 
produced  after  both 
Infrared  and  Raman 
spectroscopy  was  compared 
with  those  in 
a  database  of  approximately  100,000 
other  spectra  and  no  match 
could  be  found. 
They  proposed  a 
honeycomb  structure  consisting 
of  linked  water 
molecules,  which  were 
held  together  by 
forces  stronger  than 
the  Van  der 
Waals  forces  which 
normally  held  water 
molecules  together.  They 
decided  to  rename 
the  “anomalous  water”, 
“Polywater”  instead,  as  its  structure 
resembled  polymers  of 
water  molecules. 

Once  Polywater  had 
been  given  a 
name  and  it’s 
structure  had  been 
discovered,  it  became 
an  overnight  obsession.