Step 1

Step 1: Identify the problem: The problem is both internal and external. MOH must maintain their “world-wide” leader status of hospitality with growth and innovation while supporting their staff. MOH understands that bridging management goals and employee satisfaction can increase employee satisfaction of their work environment, which reflects in their performance and thus progresses the organizations development to its future goals (Heathfield, 2004).
Step 2: Describe the root cause for the problem. MOH must find the correct balance of intrinsic and extrinsic practices that retains employees, while increases their satisfaction and motivates their performance.
Step 3: Prescribe possible alternatives: MOH developed the O-zone, I am certain MOH incurred a cost to complete this (supplies, R&D) but they could have motivated their employees without spending money. Pozin (2011) expresses ideas like: appreciation recognition-giving a certificate, throwing a recognition party inviting their family and removing front-line management- trust the team to make and lead with correct judgement and decision, if they don’t, invest in the employee and train them.
Another alternative would be for MOH to reduce the staff daily work hours to seven, with 2-paid 20-minute breaks. Consider working the employees at seven-hour shifts eliminating that traditional 30 minute of unpaid break-time – this would encourage employee family time and thus increasing employee motivation. This may reflect in happier, more committed staff to ensuring the quality of the guest needs.
Step 4: Recommend a plan of action (decision/implementation):
Internal Decision 1: Build the O-zone/successful: To build an area in the hotel where employees can “get away” from the stresses of their work environment—a happy place to have fun and relax. This area will foster relations, motivate performance, and recognize development. “Because of the good environment, it helps me enjoy working more” (Marshall, Mottier ; Lewis, 2015). Although, currently successful, ongoing assessments will need to be completed.
Internal Decision 2: Invest in their employees/successful: Investing to retain and acquire the best, quality employees is, of itself, the best competitive edge. Halvorson (2015) states investing in employees “builds loyalty, creates promotable staff, keeps employees engaged and saves money (no turn-around)”. There is no evidence to suggest they have started internal training, but the results of the O-zone report the employees are ready and eager to begin.
Internal Decision 3: Management to develop HRM practices/successful: Training will encourage management to be positive, have a flexible environment, and encourage an employee’s growth (Bianca, 2012). Management will support the employees by allowing “adequate breaks, staff functions that involve family, and provide health/well-being opportunities” (Marshall, Mottier & Lewis, 2015).
External Decision 1: R&D/Develop a questionnaire/successful: To determine the employee’s reaction to facility changes and their effect on motivation. This questionnaire help management use McGregor’s Y Theory which suggests that management must know how to motivate and lead each employee based on the individual needs to gain the employee’s full potential. Based on these results the MOH constructed the O-zone to so that all employee based on– gender, work environment, and age felt valued and trusted (Theory X and Theory Y: Understanding People’s Motivations, n.d.).
Step 5: Why is this case important and relevant to a study of business? HRM must see employees as assets and find balance between management and staff needs. They can encourage and develop a team environment, grow skills and knowledge of the employees while supporting the business model of management. This fosters a win-win for the retention of the best qualified employees and over-all organizational performance (Burma, 2014).