I under review in Scientific Reports** where again I

I have received my Bachelor’s degree from the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering at
Middle East Technical University (METU), Turkey in July 2016 and currently I am about to get my
Master’s degree from the same department. METU has previously been ranked in top 100 universities
in the world and our department is consistently getting students from the top 2% of the university
entrance exam, which is taken by around 2 million high school graduates every year in Turkey. After I
was ranked in the top 0.06% in 2011 in this exam, I was admitted to our department and my journey in
photonics has started. Currently, as a research assistant, I have been working on integrated photonics
applications. I have been trained in a well-equipped clean room and gained experience on every step of
semiconductor device fabrication from material growth with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to
photolithography and various thin film deposition techniques. As a result of my studies so far, I have
recently published a paper as the first author about infrared photodetectors in Journal of Applied
Physics*. In addition, our manuscript about the stability of the opto-mechanic phase shifters is under
review in Scientific Reports** where again I am the first author. Moreover, I have also presented my
work in an SPIE conference*** at Anaheim, US this year and submitted another study for CLEO 2018
conference****. I believe that I have gained enough experience to decide about the best fit within the
subfields of photonics for me and I think I really enjoy working on integrated opto-mechanics about
which I have read quite a few groundbreaking results from Yale University in the last three years. In
particular, various optical phase shifter designs from Prof. Hong Tang’s group has been the main
references through my Master’s education and I would be really honored, if I could get the chance to
work with him for my PhD studies.
Starting from the last year of my undergraduate education, I have joined in Quantum Devices and
Nanophotonics Research Laboratory where I have been designing, fabricating and testing electronicphotonic
devices under the supervision of Prof. Serdar Kocaman whose research focuses on integrating
all the optical communication components on the same chip. In my first project, I worked on designing
and fabricating of photodetectors. I have worked on developing mid-wave infrared (MWIR) HgCdTe
photon-detectors and I have designed my own sensor prototype so that the detectors with low quality
substrates provide similar performance with the ideal diffusion limited detectors. During my study, I
developed and utilized an in-house numerical tool, which iteratively solves Poisson, current and
continuity equations besides the evaluation of optical and electrical properties, and I used a well-known
commercial software Sentaurus TCAD from Synopsys to verify my evaluations. Detailed results of this
study are published in Journal of Applied Physics* in October 2017. Now, I am supervising one of the
new members of our team, Can Livanelioglu, on his research project that is based on the comparison of
recombination mechanisms suppression covering all atmospheric windows and we are aiming to submit
our results to a peer-reviewed journal before the end of 2017.
With the help of my studies on infrared photodetectors, I am now capable of semiconductor material
growth with MBE systems, photolithography processes, wet and dry etch, thin film deposition (thermal,
e-beam & sputtering), dicing, substrate grinding, wire bonding, flip-chip bonding and optical/electrical
characterization.
Prof. Kocaman believes opto-mechanical devices will be an important part of the future all optical
systems and have also encouraged me to work on opto-mechanical structures for broadband all optical
phase shifters. Even though adaptation to the new topic in addition to my ongoing study took some extra
effort, it was completely worth it as it has been an invaluable experience for me. I have been observing
the different point-of-views towards the practical concerns and theoretical concepts. For instance,
feature sizes (µm vs nm) and lithography techniques (photolithography vs e-beam lithography) are quite  different in the infrared photodetectors and the opto-mechanical phase shifters. In my project, I have
first started with working on the equations governing the physical principles of opto-mechanic phase
shifters, their relations and numerical solving techniques. I have read the literature and theoretically
reproduced the results in a number of papers. As a result, I have noticed that some of the previously
suggested opto-mechanical phase shifter designs include assumptions that are not valid for high degree
of deflection cases. After a precise iterative solution implementation, I have showed that cantilever
structures (fixed in one end) collapse before they generate significant phase shift whereas doubleclamped
(fixed in both end) beams are able to produce the necessary phase shift, 180°, for the optical
switching. Moreover, I modelled the physical stability of opto-mechanical phase shifters in terms of the
initial separation and the device length dependencies for a variety of geometries. Then, I have proposed
a formulation that defines the maximum power that the opto-mechanic phase shifter can handle before
it collapses. Our manuscript including the details of these results, some of which is presented in the
figure below, has now been under review in Scientific Reports** and I am currently working on an
experimental implementation for a novel phase shifter. different in the infrared photodetectors and the opto-mechanical phase shifters. In my project, I have
first started with working on the equations governing the physical principles of opto-mechanic phase
shifters, their relations and numerical solving techniques. I have read the literature and theoretically
reproduced the results in a number of papers. As a result, I have noticed that some of the previously
suggested opto-mechanical phase shifter designs include assumptions that are not valid for high degree
of deflection cases. After a precise iterative solution implementation, I have showed that cantilever
structures (fixed in one end) collapse before they generate significant phase shift whereas doubleclamped
(fixed in both end) beams are able to produce the necessary phase shift, 180°, for the optical
switching. Moreover, I modelled the physical stability of opto-mechanical phase shifters in terms of the
initial separation and the device length dependencies for a variety of geometries. Then, I have proposed
a formulation that defines the maximum power that the opto-mechanic phase shifter can handle before
it collapses. Our manuscript including the details of these results, some of which is presented in the
figure below, has now been under review in Scientific Reports** and I am currently working on an
experimental implementation for a novel phase shifter