Glaucon’s he identify? And how does Socrates categorize justice?Glaucon

Glaucon’s (in Book II) renewal of Thrasymachus’ position from Book I begins with a distinction between three kinds of goods; what kinds of goods does he identify? And how does Socrates categorize justice?Glaucon begins by distinguishing three kinds of goods to determine which kind Socrates would place justice within.  The first of its three kinds of goods is good for their own sakes, such as joy. The second is good for their own sake and for their consequence such as health, sight, and knowledge. The third is good not for their own sake but for their consequences such as money and medicine. Socrates placed justice in the second, good for their own sake and for their consequences.  Glaucon rebuttals Socrates placement of justice and assumes that justice is not a good for its own sake but strictly for its consequences. He explains, most people cannot act unjustly without unpleasant consequences. Therefore, they come to the rational agreement among themselves to be just to each other to obtain the benefit of other people being just to them.  Thus no one will endure injustice. To illustrate, if I borrow money from my friend with the intention of never paying him and/or her back what is owed, for some period I will collect rewards. But at the same time, I will establish a bad reputation of an unreliable person, making it hard to sustain any friendship. As a result, living an unjust life where I end up with a bad reputation and miserable is less desirable than the rewards of it. Therefore we practice justice, not for its own sake but rather its consequence. It is our self-interest to be just as it is a means to avoid being harmed by the injustice of others. Since Glaucon rebuttals Socrates placement of justice in the second, he is challenged by him to demonstrate and show that justice is good in itself and independent of its consequence. Socrates responds to this challenge by thinking of justice in terms of the city first then the individual. To illustrate, Socrates wants them to think of justice in terms of the mind of an individual but its hard to understand the mind of an individual, so he searches for justice in the city. He constructs a just city only by necessary desires such as food, clothing, and housing. Socrates argues that if there is justice in the city there is justice in the mind and soul of every human being in that city.