Even anything you did (not in a 6th grade

Even though Ancient Egypt is over-discussed to a ridiculous extent, and no one knows what the Agricultural Revolution was, there are supplementary reasons that Ancient Mesopotamia was more original and innovative than these other time periods. Just because things changed in these other time periods, that doesn’t imply it actually mattered. Ancient Mesopotamia did more for our civilization than they did for theirs. Ancient Egypt is known for one thing, and one thing only, and – you guessed it – it’s mummification. Mummification was a ritual that only had importance internally. By that I mean, it rarely affected anything outside of Egypt. Was there ever anything you did (not in a 6th grade unit about Egypt) where you thought, “Hey, thank goodness for Ancient Egypt and the way they innovated and wrapped up dead bodies in cloth, because otherwise, we wouldn’t have ________.” No, you never thought that because it was never relevant to any innovation in our day and age. Going on, you may be reading this and thinking, hold on, they had a number system and hieroglyphics and all their religious beliefs, so is that not change? No – every time period had a number system after Mesopotamia. Every time period had a writing system after Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia had religious beliefs too. That is not an anti-religion statement, but what I am Arnold 2stating is that you are not generating change just because you have a belief that is slightly different than others, that is simply free speech. What in the world is the Agricultural Revolution? The Agricultural Revolution was when there was a development is technology in the farming industry around the time of 10,000 BC.  That development caused farmers to think deeper and experiment – trial and error, as they call it. The slash-and-burn technique was the most and almost only noteworthy of the new methods, and its still used today. Everything else was a big deal then, but because it got quickly outdated with another breakthrough, no one now really cares. But really, if you think about it, the slash-and-burn technique doesn’t affect the industry all that much. It is used little nowadays, and not really to anyone’s dismay, like they miss the old days when nature couldn’t produce its own nutrients so for the next 3 years, everything’s burnt and look like a block of charcoal. I mean think about it, did the Agricultural Revolution benefit your life to the extent of numbers, writing, laws, and the common wheel? Last, but certainly not least, Mesopotamia. You did some math today, did you not? You wrote on a Post-it or something today, did you not? You drove or rode in a car today, did you not? You followed you communities laws today, did you not? You ate some produce today (grown using a plow), did you not? Case closed… but I am required to write 5-8 sentences, so here goes. All of these things were prominent in your life, not just today, but all your life. It’s not like something you intermittently use, just when the situation requires, like an emergency preparedness kit. It’s something that has made its way into your everyday rotation, the simple things, even absent-minded things (number system, writing, wheel, laws, crops; sound familiar?) Arnold 3As my mother rubs off on me, I would like to share an analogy. Here it is, brace yourself for the guidance you are about to incur: This situation is consistent to that of legos. The Agricultural Revolution would be a black lego, something small and encasing some value, not easily noticed, Egypt a neon yellow lego, a civilization no different or more intelligent than the fellow competitors, yet noted higher for some indefensible reason, and Mesopotamia wouldn’t even be one. Mesopotamia is actually a 6-year old boy that shows up and builds something out of all the other inferiors that are just a little piece considered worthless, but needed to construct something in the grand scheme of things. As a certain world history textbook put it, “Mesopotamians were good at solving problems. They invented tools and developed special knowledge to improve their lives.” (Littell 100) In conclusion, I believe you should side with me because of the prior eight concrete rationalities based entirely on indisputable facts. Every one of my talking points is backed up by an in-depth knowledge studied and confirmed numerous times by their respective owners of the sites used. Maybe you should get out there and propagandize others to think as I do. You know, get our numbers up. Wonder who invented the number system?