Britishness as a term is firstly used to refer to Britons collectively as early as 1682

Britishness as a term is firstly used to refer to Britons collectively as early as 1682. However, it is introduced into the political and the academic field in the last half of the 20th century.( Piégay 1) Linda Colley a historian , states that the concept of Britishness basically appeared in the 18th century and is promoted by the common religion of Protestantism, which is used as a propaganda weapon to encourage the English, the Scots and the Welsh to unite around a com¬mon flag – and against Catholic enemies, in particular France and Spain.( Schuch 53) .She also declared that it is after the Acts of Union 1707with the construction of the Kingdom of Great Britain where the ethnic groups of Great Britain started to think of themselves as simultaneously British but also Scottish, English, and/or Welsh when England, Scotland and Wales united in 1707 and set up common features like the constitutional monarchy, parliament or church. Britishness started to gain popularity in the 19th century because of Britain’s imperial position in the world. Everyone associated Britain with monarchy, the Queen or its power in the world.
1.3.5 Not Easy Being British:
Richard Eyre, In his article entitled What is Britishness? Richard Eyre scrutinizes his cultural DNA for clues. that published in The Guardian (2004) states that it is not an easy job to define British Identity and declares that “Being British is a variable ideology”.ModoodTariq shares the same view in his book Not easy being British: Color, culture and citizenshippie which he argues that :
It is not easy to identify the values, processes, and customs which are distinctively British; not easy, having identified them, to be in all aspects proud, grateful, and loyal; …not easy to establish and protect public policies and laws which recognize and rejoice that there are many different ways of being British, with sources of strength in different continents, religions, histories, languages. (Modood, xi) .